Cases reported "Hyperkinesis"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/2. Intraputaminal infusion of nerve growth factor to support adrenal medullary autografts in Parkinson's disease. One-year follow-up of first clinical trial.

    Experimental studies in rodents show that beta-nerve growth factor can increase the survival, neurite outgrowth, and functional effect of grafts of adrenal chromaffin cells to the basal ganglia. We, therefore, have begun to investigate whether treatment with nerve growth factor might also increase the functional effect of autografts of adrenal medullary tissue in patients with Parkinson's disease. Previous studies have shown that stereotactic implantation of adrenal tissue pieces produces a transient functional improvement that lasts for a few months. This report describes a trial of grafting of adrenal chromaffin tissue into the putamen, supported by infusion of nerve growth factor. The patient is a 63-year-old woman with a 19-year history of Parkinson's disease, now complicated by on-off phenomena and drug-induced hyperkinesia, despite optimized medical management. The left adrenal gland was removed, and the medulla was dissected into 1- to 2-mm3 pieces in a solution containing nerve growth factor purified from mouse submandibular gland. Pieces were implanted in six tracts 3 to 4 mm from a previously placed cannula in the left putamen. Through the cannula, nerve growth factor was infused for 23 days for a total dose of 3.3 mg. Clinical assessment consisted of global ratings for rigidity and/or hypokinesia and for drug-induced hyperkinesia. Measures of gait and fine-motor control were also made. The motor readiness potential and auditory evoked potentials were recorded.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = putamen
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/2. transplantation in Parkinson's disease: two cases of adrenal medullary grafts to the putamen.

    Autologous adrenal medullary tissue was transplanted unilaterally to the putamen in two patients with severe Parkinson's disease. The first patient exhibited a transient, two-day improvement of motor performance in the limbs contralateral to the implantation site. He also had significantly longer episodes of normal function for about two months. The second patient reported a minor improvement of balance and gait, again lasting for two months. Electrophysiological studies of the motor readiness and auditory evoked potentials were consistent with increased catecholaminergic activity in the basal ganglia after transplantation in both patients. Positron emission tomography showed no postoperative alteration of receptor density in the putamen. No significant adverse effects of the transplantation were observed in the patients' performance on neurological and psychological tests or in their quantitative electroencephalogram and cerebral blood flow recordings. Immediately after the grafting, one patient showed transient signs of sympathetic hyperactivity, probably caused by release of catecholamines from the implanted tissue into the peripheral circulation. We conclude that catecholamine-rich cellular implants in the basal ganglia have transient beneficial effects in patients with severe Parkinson's disease.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3
keywords = putamen
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Hyperkinesis'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.