FAQ - Syncope, Vasovagal
(Powered by Yahoo! Answers)

vasovagal syncope?


is this a heart disease ?? or is this just a condition ?
----------

It's a condition. Vasovagal syncope is the most common type of fainting. There are a number of different syncope syndromes which all fall under the umbrella of vasovagal syncope. The common element among these conditions is the central mechanism leading to loss of consciousness. The differences among them are in the factors which trigger this mechanism.

People with vasovagal syncope typically have recurrent episodes, usually when exposed to a specific trigger. The initial episode often occurs when the person is a teenager, then recurs in clusters throughout his or her life. Prior to losing consciousness, the individual frequently experiences a prodrome of symptoms such as lightheadedness, nausea, sweating, ringing in the ears, and visual disturbances. These last for at least a few seconds before consciousness is lost, which typically happens when the person is sitting up or standing. When they pass out, they fall down; and when in this position, effective blood flow to the brain is immediately restored, allowing the person to wake up.

The autonomic nervous system's physiologic state leading to loss of consciousness may persist for several minutes, so:

-if the person tries to sit or stand when they wake up, they may pass out again; and
-the person may be nauseated, pale, and sweaty for several minutes after they wake up.

Treatment for vasovagal syncope focuses on avoidance of triggers, restoring blood flow to the brain during an impending episode, and measures that interrupt or prevent the pathophysiologic mechanism that causes the episodes.

Hope this was somewhat helpful.  (+ info)

Vasovagal Syncope?


I recently passed out because I hurt my finger. I also passed out a few months ago while on my period, I think because of really bad cramps. I half-collapsed the other night probably from standing up. I get dizzy and have a "grey out" from standing up almost every day (recently). Sometimes I just have a "grey out" while standing up. I've passed out 2 times from low-ish blood sugar levels (I'm pretty sure). I passed out once when I was 8 or 9, I don't know why though.


WHY?
I understand that these can happen with low blood pressure, but my dad has pretty high blood pressure. He takes medication for it and I think it's on the cusp of being really bad. Also, I was on cross country this past year and never felt faint or whatever from running, so I'm thinking I don't have low blood pressure. Also, my doctor would probably have told me if he though I did. I'm 15, I'm not anemic, I eat a fair amount and I'm pretty healthy, I'm 5'2ish" 97lbs.

Does anyone have an explanation for this?
Can blood pressure change over a short period of time? I mean, like 8 months, not 10 seconds, by the way.

Oh, and I really do mean "why" I know that it happens, but WHY? Most people, to my knowledge, don't get lightneaded from standing up.
Just to be clear, I KNOW WHAT VASOVAGAL SYNCOPE IS. I want to know if there is any reason why it happens. NOT triggers. I know enough of the triggers and don't care to know any more of them.
CORRECTION:

Is there a specific reason why the vagus nerve tell the heart to slow down when exposed to certain triggers or just randomly?
----------

Definition
Syncope (commonly referred to as fainting) is a loss of consciousness that occurs when you experience a significant reduction of blood flow to your brain. Fainting is often caused by a significant drop in blood pressure or from a very slow heart rate. The result is a sudden reduction of blood flow to your brain, causing you to lose consciousness.

The most common cause of fainting is due to vasovagal syncope. Vasovagal syncope is triggered by a stimulus that results in an exaggerated and inappropriate response in the part of your nervous system that regulates involuntary body functions, including heart rate and blood flow (autonomic nervous system). When some sort of stimulus triggers this exaggerated response, both your heart rate and blood pressure drop, quickly reducing blood flow to your brain and leading to loss of consciousness. A person who has fainted due to vasovagal syncope recovers quickly, usually within seconds or a few minutes.

Common triggers of vasovagal syncope include standing for long periods, dehydration, the sight of blood, coughing, urination, having a bowel movement and emotional distress. But in some cases, the cause of vasovagal syncope can't be determined.

Fainting is common, and treatment is unnecessary in most cases. However, sometimes fainting can indicate an underlying disease for which you'll need treatment.  (+ info)

The "why" behind vasovagal syncope?


I recently passed out because I hurt my finger. I also passed out a few months ago while on my period, I think because of really bad cramps. I half-collapsed the other night probably from standing up. I get dizzy and have a "grey out" from standing up almost every day (recently). Sometimes I just have a "grey out" while standing up. I've passed out 2 times from low-ish blood sugar levels (I'm pretty sure). I passed out once when I was 8 or 9, I don't know why though.


WHY?
I understand that these can happen with low blood pressure, but my dad has pretty high blood pressure. He takes medication for it and I think it's on the cusp of being really bad. Also, I was on cross country this past year and never felt faint or whatever from running, so I'm thinking I don't have low blood pressure. Also, my doctor would probably have told me if he though I did. I'm 15, I'm not anemic, I eat a fair amount and I'm pretty healthy, I'm 5'2ish" 97lbs.

Does anyone have an explanation for this?
Can blood pressure change over a short period of time? I just ran up the stairs and felt a little dizzy.
I mean, like a 8 months, not 10 seconds, by the way.
Oh, and I really do mean "why" I know that it happens, but WHY? Most people, to my knowledge, don't get lightneaded from standing up.
----------

Your body does something called homeostasis every second of your life. This process controls breathing, heart rate, hormonal responses, nerve responses etc. It is the body's way of keeping everything running perfectly in unison. So your breathing, heartrate, and yes even your blood pressure change every second in response to your body's needs.

The vagal nerve does all kinds of strange things including slowing your heart rate down to the point that you pass out. It can cause a sudden drop in blood pressure too.  (+ info)

How do i stop having this Vasovagal Syncope??? Fainting from blood....?


For the past 3 years i have been avoiding Doctors,so they wont take my blood and etc.all because of this fainting thing! and i am sick of it! I have had this for a long time (im 15) and when i was 8 it went away but then when i was 10 BAM it came back again! and i don't know what to do..and when im near blood or anything gross,i lose my vision,cold sweat,lose my hearing,VERY Light headed,and my legs feel heavy,and i cant take it!! WHy do i have this? And how do i make it go away?????
----------

Hmm, I don't faint for blood, I faint for pain(pulled muscle, bad gas pain), low blood pressure(don't stand up to fast). since you have the term I will assume you have an actual diagnosis. What happens is something tells your body there is a problem, my body thinks pain means send blood to fight the invader/prevent infection. The circulatory system is opened up so blood flows easily, right the the lowest point, brain does not get blood and over you go.
For a blood draw at the MD just tell them you have to be lying down, don't look when they take the blood. Drink plenty of water for two days before and the day after to help keep BP normal and veins easy to stick. Visit the restroom right before the blood draw!
I found that growth spurts can cause this to be worse so once you are "grown up" it might just get much better.
Good luck!
Here is a good site to read up
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/vasovagal-syncope/ds00806  (+ info)

My husband was diagnosed with vasovagal syncope in the ER. His pcp has not helped at all. Who do we see ?


He was diagnosed in April 09. We have done the EEG, EKG, all kinds of scans...So many tests I can't even remember them all. We were even sent home with a heart monitor for 24 hours. He spent 4 days in the hospital and were told nothing medically was wrong. The final day he fainted in front of them. All his vitals looked good and they were even able to induce a spell. This was when they diagnosed vasovafal. His pcp has told us to wait 6 months then come back to eval for going back to work. We have moved in with my parents due to finances. They have put him on Paxil and we were told to live with it. He can't work or drive. He is still fainting. Just this morning as well. any help would be much appreciated. Not to mention we don't freaking qualify for disability or social security because of the six month restrictions....so frustrated.
----------

Hello there hun! Wow I am so sorry you've dealt with this but I might be able to help a little.

I was having fainting spells and I had sleep studies MRIs of the brain, EEGs...you name it. Nothing came back abnormal enough to give a treatment plan to.

So then my neurologist referred me to someone called a anatomic specialist. There's one in Boston, MA and I think they are rare. They were able to do a Tilt Table Test on me and figure out why I was collapsing. They called it Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome, a form of Dysautonomia.

Guess what else? They told me to take salt tablets (you can even order them online) and I haven't fainted since! I take them everyday, you can buy them OTC so it's cheap...Thermo Tabs is what he told me to take and they have SAVED MY LIFE. I was worried about loosing any career but it never happened.

Write to me if I can help in any way.


Big Hugs!

ggundel86@gmail.com  (+ info)

How can I treat vasovagal with alternative medicine?


I have vasovagal, and I need an alternative medicine route to heal it.

Thanks!
----------

Vasovagal? You have it? So does everyone else...it's not a problem...it's in your body...and can be affected by increases in pressure (that's how Elvis died taking a poo) as well as many other things...

You my friend most likely have Vasovagal syncope...that is what you want help with. Basically that is when there is an involuntary reaction and your blood pressure drops (due to simultaneously widening vessels and decreased heart rate)  (+ info)

What are some treatments for vasovagal reflex?


My father has been told there is no cure for his disease and that he will be bed ridden for the rest of his life. Are there known treatments for vasovagal reflex?
----------

The vasovagal reflex, which causes the heart rate to slow and the blood vessels to widen, or dilate. As a result, blood pools in the lower body and less blood goes to the brain. This reflex can be triggered by many things, including stress, pain, fear, coughing, holding your breath, and urinating.

Though vasovagal reactions themselves are not fatal, treatment involving medication and adequate hydration is imperative because resulting falls can be harmful.

Beta-blockers are commonly used to treat vasovagal syncope. Though it seems paradoxical to select a negatively chronotropic medication to treat bradycardia, the negative inotropic effects may decrease the afferent signals from the mechanoreceptors to the brain stem, thereby suppressing the efferent arm of the reflex .

Disopyramide has been used successfully in the treatment of neurally mediated syncope. This type 1 antiarrhythmic has profound negative inotropic effects and anticholinergic properties. The negative inotropic effects may decrease afferent mechanoreceptor activity, while the anticholinergic effects may decrease vagal (efferent) output.

The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have also been used with success in patients who have vasovagal syncope, though the mechanism of action is speculative. A study has shown that intracerebroventricular serotonin induces hypotension, inhibits renal sympathetics, and excites adrenal sympathetics. SSRIs may blunt the response to shifts in serotonin levels.

Fludrocortisone acetate, which has volume-expanding properties, has been used with some success. Midodrine, which received US Food and Drug Administration approval in September 1996 for the treatment of orthostatic hypotension, has peripheral alpha-adrenergic effects and has shown promise in treating vasovagal reactions .

Vasovagal reactions do not appear to be life-threatening but certainly are a cause of great concerns. In many cases, the condition can occur suddenly and without warning. The falls incurred from such vasovagal events can be very dangerous, making avoidance of causative exercise prudent, but not necessarily imperative.
________________________

I suggest your Dad get a 2nd opinion. Yes, it can't be cured at this time but, it can be treated with meds. I wonder why his doctor didn't discuss a treatment plan? With proper treatment he should be able to have a normal life. I didn't see any articles where the patient was forced to be bed ridden. Try a new cardiologist & discuss treatment. If he is nervous walking around....he can always wear an event recorder to fine tune his condition for his Cardiologist. Good luck!  (+ info)

What can you tell me about syncope, especially the cardiac related?


I'm doing a paper on heart conditions, and I have to talk about syncope caused by cardiac conditions. I've read some about it, but I'm trying to get the practical side of it. How ofter someone with the condition faints? For how long? What are the symptoms before it happens? Any ways to prevent those? What age range does it normally affect? Thanks.
----------

Syncope can affect any age group. As you may have read, there are various reasons that may cause it. The frequency varies with individual. If the event is triggered, the person may have it once or twice in a lifetime, or weekly. The time in which they pass out also varies on what the initial cause of it is.

Before someone faints, they may have less than a second up to a minute or so to know that it is going to happen. Often it is lightheartedness that they feel. They may feel dizzy, or suddenly weak.

Prevention is focused on finding why it is happening.

Good luck on your paper, and hope I helped!  (+ info)

What are the effects of smoking weed with neurocardiogenic syncope?


I have been diagnosed with this thing called neurocardiogenic syncope where if not enough blood gets to my brain then I will fain. It happens most often just after excercise or sometimes after I have been laying down and I suddenly get up. Do you think that smoking marijuana when you have this would produce any more negative effects than just smoking at all?
----------

I think I have that too, I get up from watching tv or laying in bed really fast, get a little dizzy, and i fall down on the ground and black out for approximately a minute or 2. I've smoked weed and it has never affected me, but I have not been diagnosed with neurocardiogenic syncope. I'll try and see if I can get a diagnosis for it to see if I actually have it but like I said, those same things happen to me after getting up, or exercising a lot.  (+ info)

What can I do to keep my Vasovagal in check?


My vasovagal has been flaring up real bad lately a have searched the net a lot but I have not found any really good ways to keep it in check. also can you answer some more questions I have like what medication or drugs I should stay away from and what foods I should eat or vitamins i can take.
----------

The most important things you can do are keeping blood volume high by staying hydrated and getting a little extra salt, and perform exercises to maintain good muscle tone. You can learn to fight it off (somewhat) through a combination of flexing muscles and slow, deep breathing.

I don't know of any vitamins that would help unless you have some type of vitamin deficiency, or any foods (other than salt) that would help. There aren't many non-prescription medicines to avoid, but the original sudafed sometimes helps. You have to get the original version of sudafed from the pharmacist counter - its not on the shelves.  (+ info)

1  2  3  4  5  

Leave a message or picture about "Syncope, Vasovagal" or enter the forum: