FAQ - Coma
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What happens when someone goes into a coma?


What do they see while they're in the coma? Is it like sleep where sometimes you see some kind of a dream or sometimes it all just looks black? I'm working on something that could really depend on this. Thanks for at least checking this out!
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What could you be working on that would depend on knowing what someone sees when they go into a coma? There are several types of comas and reasons for being in them. It’s like saying someone is sick by trying to describe everything from the flu to cancer. Some comas are like being in a very deep sleep, others are drug-induced like anesthesia, and some are brain death with no hope of recovery. A neurologist will be able to tell you more, The few times I’ve been under anesthesia for surgery it was like going to sleep and waking up without dreaming. Although one time after I woke up from major surgery I didn’t remember, and still don’t, several hours prior to the surgery, it’s just a blank spot; no dreams, no looks black. From my personal experience I would say they see nothing.  (+ info)

What should i do if a diabetic coma happens?


I'm recently going to move in with my grandmother because it's closer to college. She has diabetes, and I'm always afraid she'll have one of those diabetic coma things. If that, god forbid.. ever happens, what things can I do before the medics etc get there?
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First you would call the paramedics immediately! You always want to try and catch her before this happens - if you see her getting dizzy or extremely agitated (these are signs that her sugar is dropping) - give her a glass of juice or a piece of candy to get her sugar up. If she is in a coma already though, not much you can do until the paramedics arrive.  (+ info)

What are the odds of surviving a diabetic coma?


If someone is in a diabetic coma, what are the survival rates?
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There are many factors in that scenario: how quickly were they diagnosed and treated, their overall health, responses to medications, among other things.

If these are all positive, chances are good that a person will recover from the coma.

As a nurse, I have seen patients come out of diabetic comas, but if their health is poor to begin with, chances are worsened.  (+ info)

What are the chances of someone coming out of coma?


A friend of mine was in a pretty bad car accident and is now in a coma at icu. Anyway are the chances of waking up high or low?
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There are a lot of factors/variables that this type of condition entails. Sometimes people pull through, sometimes they don't. There is a LOT of technology that can help the chances of a good outcome. Sometimes doctors will induce a coma medically to help the body rest and recuperate. Ask the Doc to be honest with you. He/She would be have more answers because like I said there are a lot of different variables to your friend's condition.  (+ info)

What are some possible causes of a 2+ week coma in an apparently healthy 22 year old male?


22 year old basketball player, collapses on the court and stays in a coma for 2+ weeks. Nothing too "easy" to figure out, now.
22 year old basketball player, collapses on the court and stays in a coma for 2+ weeks. Nothing too "easy" to figure out, now.

Yesyes, it's hypothetical.
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I am assuming this is hypothetical.

vascular events (CVA)

demyelination

infection, such as cerebral abcess

focal head injury

infection, such as meningitis or encephalitis

epilepsy

hypoxia and hypercarbia

drugs, poisoning and overdoses ( including alcohol)

metabolic/endocrine causes, such as diabetic coma, hepatic or renal failure, hypothyroidism, severe electrolyte disturbances

hypotension, or hypertensive crisis

diffuse head injury

subarachnoid haemorrhage

hypothermia, hyperthermia

sometimes, people just pretend !

Pick one! I personally will go with the electrolyte in-balance myself, due to loss of essential 'salts' during exercises. He may have drank too little water, or too much and created a saturation within his system  (+ info)

How to help a patient woke up from a coma?


My Mom is in the hospital for 7 weeks now. She is a coma from Hypoglycemia. It means low in sugar from Diabetic patient. The doctor says "She is vegetable." She is all swollen and she is on the venting machine to help her breathe. She can't breathe on her own. She has tubes coming everywhere. She doesn't pass urine either. Is there hope and how I can get her back?
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Sometimes people do recover from comas, despite all the 'medical' expectations. And from experience- Sometimes even people who seem unconscious are more aware of their surroundings than the look to be.

Talk to your mother- a lot. If she has any books she likes, read to her. She will appreciate it, even if she can't react. Touch her and even hug her as well as you are able: Some studies suggest that such contacts can help a body correct itself at times. If the hospital permits, bring her music if you know what her favorite songs are.

Good luck, Honey.  (+ info)

How to help someone wake from a coma?


Im twelve and my dad is in the hospital with a coma. I really want to see him awake and talk to me again, can anyone pls tell me how to try and help someone ease out of a coma?
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Sometimes a coma is the brain's way of trying to cure itself from physical/shock injuries.
Sometimes people come out of them, but there are times when there is no predicting.
As long as those around you encourage you to do this, visit your Dad and talk to him about things as you have done before. If he wakes up he may or may not remember your chats. Folks sure never talk around him like he's not in the room because people in comas often hear more than we think they are capable of processing.
Pray a lot.  (+ info)

Question about coma and risk in returning to a coma?


I've heard that a person who has been in a coma previously, is a higher candidate to go into a coma again. Specifically if a person has surgery and goes into a coma, how likely is it that they will go back into a coma during a subsequent surgery.

My understanding is that this is true. But can someone shed some factual information on this issue?

I have a friend who has been in a coma more than once and some people are skeptical that this could be true.

Thanks in advance for your answers.
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I don't know all that much about comas specifically, but medical situations do tend to repeat themselves, especially where chronic illness is present.

Our bodies all have their own fingerprints of weaknesses and strengths which affect how they respond to trauma. Your friend's response patterns include appear to include coma. (Anesthesia is going to be a huge burden on her detoxification system, which is already overloaded because of the kidney problems. It will necessarily stay in her system longer and it will be tricky to for the doctors to get the balance right. This was her second surgery within a week as well and she hadn't recovered from the first. In other words, plenty of risk factors.)

What I've observed of this crisis as it has unfolded is completely within normal parameters.  (+ info)

What causes a person to slip into a coma?


I've always been curious about this.

I know this can vary in many ways, but what are some common situations of why someones slips into a coma?? And how long can they be in a coma for (shortest to longest time periods)??

Thanks :D
would something tragic that suddenly happen in someone's life be a way somone could freak out and slip into a coma or is it not possible to slip into a coma after something sudden happened and the person is like umm....freaking out or can't take it (i can't really describe properly :P)
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A comatose state occurs when there is direct trauma to the brain including massive stroke (ischemic or hemorrhagic), electrolyte abnormalities (hypo/hypernatremia), drug intoxication, anoxic brain injury (lack of oxygen to the brain usually due to cardiac arrest or respiratory failure). The length of coma depends on the underlying cause and is very variable.
You may be thinking of locked in syndrome or catatonia which is a psychiatric problem that causes patients to not speak or do anything after experiencing devastating circumstances. There is nothing physically wrong with the brain rather it is psychological.  (+ info)

What would happen if you were in a coma when you were 6 then woke up when you are 16?


Is that even possible? I don't really know much about comas so maybe a little kid doesn't have a very high chance of staying in a coma for 10 years but I don't know. Would they still act like a little kid when they woke up? Or would they somehow know that they are older?
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To go through puberty while unconscious is just messed up. I wonder if that's ever happened?

And no, they wouldn't act more mature. Maturity (and to a lesser extent at that age, wisdom) comes from experience, interaction, etc. He'd probably be extremely insecure, frightened, and overall a 6 year old in a young man's body. Probably be humping every nurse's leg in sight without know why.  (+ info)

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