Cases reported "Periapical Abscess"

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21/86. Chronic submasseteric abscess: anatomic, radiologic, and pathologic features.

    Herein we present five cases of submasseteric abscess that most commonly occurred in patients with a history dental disease. CT has been the main imaging method for diagnosing lesions in the masticator space and adjacent to the mandible; however, we found that, in some of our cases, CT defined the lesion poorly or not at all. In some cases, MR imaging defined the lesion better. Radiologic manifestations of this condition and pathologic correlations are discussed.
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22/86. The management of a dental abscess in a patient with acute intermittent porphyria. A case report.

    The case of a 40-year-old white woman with a periapical abscess of pulpal origin and the medical condition of acute intermittent porphyria is described. The oral and dental management of the case with reference to complications, etiology, and symptoms of acute intermittent porphyria is reviewed.
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23/86. Management of a patient with mobius syndrome: a case report.

    mobius syndrome is a rare congenital disorder with the primary diagnostic criteria of congenital facial and abducent nerve palsy. Orofacial anomalies and limb malformations may be associated with the disorder. Involvement of other cranial nerves also is common. Occasionally, the V, X, XI, and XII cranial nerves are involved, resulting in difficulty of chewing, swallowing, and coughing, which often leads to respiratory complications. Mental retardation and autism have been reported in some cases. An 18-year-old Hispanic male came to the general practice Residency clinic at the University of illinois at chicago for dental treatment. The patient had a history of mobius syndrome, mental retardation, and behavioral problems. Because of acute situational anxiety and violent behavior, we arranged for the patient to have general anesthesia while we provided complete oral rehabilitation. This article discusses the treatment of a patient, including special considerations taken during anesthesia and dental management. A review of the special challenges concerning patients with such a condition are reviewed.
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24/86. Endodontic treatment of dens invaginatus type III with three root canals and open apical foramen.

    AIM: To describe the conservative endodontic treatment and the 1-year follow-up of a permanent maxillary lateral incisor with dens invaginatus. SUMMARY: Frequently, the root canal treatment of invaginated teeth is challenging because of problems associated with gaining access to the root canals and with variations of canal morphology associated with this type of malformation. The present case describes the complex root canal treatment of dens invaginatus in a maxillary lateral incisor with three root canals (Oehler type III), incomplete apex formation, necrotic pulp and abscess formation. After gaining access to two root canals and the invagination with the help of a dental operating-microscope, the canals and the invagination were instrumented and calcium hydroxide dressing was applied for 6 months. apexification and osseous bone repair were achieved, and the canals were filled with gutta-percha. A follow-up after 1 year showed that the tooth was free of any clinical symptoms and the periapical condition was normal. KEY learning POINTS: The present case demonstrated that conservative root canal treatment can be performed successfully even in sever cases of dens invaginatus. The use of a dental operating microscope can help in the management of complicated cases of invaginated teeth through conventional root canal treatment.
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keywords = dental
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25/86. Dental alterations associated with X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets.

    The X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets is a rare metabolic disorder characterized by low serum phosphate levels caused by a decreased renal tubular reabsorption of inorganic phosphates. The initial complaints are a delay in the development of walking caused by deformity of the legs. Oral findings include poorly mineralized dentin, enlarged pulp chambers and root canals, and periradicular abscesses in caries-free teeth. We present three patients from the same family with X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets showing bone and dental alterations.
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26/86. Management of extra oral sinus cases: a clinical dilemma.

    The cutaneous sinus tract of dental origin is an uncommon but well documented condition. Its diagnosis is not always easy unless the treating clinician considers the possibility of its dental origin. Such patients may undergo multiple surgical excisions, biopsies, and antibiotic regimens, but all of them fail with the recurrence of the sinus tract. This is because the primary etiology is incorrectly diagnosed. This case report describes the treatment of four patients presenting with variable complaints of pain and purulent or hemorrhagic discharge from lesions of the face. Clinical and radiographic examination revealed carious teeth with radiolucent areas indicating chronic periradicular abscess. The teeth were restorable, so nonsurgical endodontic therapy was performed in all of them. No systemic antibiotic therapy was provided. The patients responded well, and the cutaneous lesions healed uneventfully. Improper diagnosis can lead to needless loss of teeth that can be otherwise maintained through timely and proper management.
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ranking = 2
keywords = dental
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27/86. Dentocutaneous fistula.

    Chronic dental infection is the most common cause of draining sinus tracts of the face and neck. These lesions can be a diagnostic challenge to the clinician who is not familiar with dentocutaneous fistula. diagnostic errors can result in multiple excisions, biopsies, and ineffective long-term antibiotic therapy. patients may require excision of the fistula once the dental abscess has been successfully treated by root-canal therapy or extraction. Nine patients are reported.
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ranking = 2
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28/86. ludwig's angina following dental treatment of a five-year-old male patient: report of a case.

    A five-year-old male child presented to the dental clinic with dental disease. This patient was otherwise healthy, with evidence of odontogenic infection (pulpal abscess) on tooth "T". Extraction of the tooth followed. Five days postoperative, the child was diagnosed as suffering from ludwig's angina. This case of ludwig's angina was found to be odontogenic in origin, but not originating from extraction of the offending tooth. ludwig's angina is an aggressive infectious process of the submandibular, sublingual, and submental fascial spaces. It remains a potentially fatal cellulitis with a mortality rate of approximately 8%, in spite of appropriate antibiotic therapy. Early recognition and treatment of ludwig's angina is extremely important due to its invasive nature.
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ranking = 6
keywords = dental
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29/86. Dental treatment for children with chronic idiopathic thrombocytopaenic purpura: a report of two cases.

    Idiopathic thrombocytopaenic purpura (ITP) is the most common acquired bleeding disorder occurring in previously healthy children. The condition is benign and self-limiting, with a high possibility of recovery. Only 15-30% of children with acute ITP develop the chronic form. Clinically, ITP presents with petechiae, ecchymoses, haematomas, epistaxis, haematuria, mucocutaneous bleeding, and occasionally, haemorrhage into tissues. oral manifestations include spontaneous gingival bleeding, petechiae or haematomas of the mucosa, tongue or palate. Two paediatric case reports are described concerning female patients diagnosed with chronic ITP. Oral findings and dental procedures are described. Standard dental treatment was performed with a platelet count higher than 50,000/mm3. The importance of adequate dental plaque control techniques in order to prevent inflammation, potential bleeding and infection in these patients is emphasized. The paediatric dentist must be aware of the clinical appearance of ITP in order to recognize the condition and successfully manage the patient.
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ranking = 3
keywords = dental
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30/86. Fatal necrotizing fasciitis of dental origin.

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a potentially fatal, acute bacterial infection characterized by extensive fascial and subcutaneous tissue necrosis. Four factors that contribute significantly to the morbidity and mortality of necrotizing fasciitis are: 1) delayed treatment, due to difficulty in recognizing the condition; 2) inappropriate treatment; 3) host debilitation; and 4) a polymicrobial infection.
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ranking = 4
keywords = dental
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Last update: September 2014