lookfordiagnosis.com
English
Spanish
Italian
Portuguese
French
Swedish

Cases reported "Osteosarcoma"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

11/96. Multifocal osteogenic sarcoma in Paget's disease.

    The most serious complication of Paget's disease is sarcomatous degeneration of pagetic bone. Multifocal sarcomatous degeneration occurs mainly in polyostotic Paget's disease. Multifocal Paget's sarcoma is uncommon and can arise in any site. We report two cases of synchronous multifocal sarcomatous degeneration. The two patients were elderly women (aged 77 and 86 years, respectively) who developed sarcomatous lesions concomitantly, in the first case report in left ilium, left tibia, and first lumbar vertebra and in the second case report in the skull, right ilium, and sacrum. Whether these cases are due to the simultaneous development of several primaries or to metastases from a single primary remains unclear.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = skull
(Clic here for more details about this article)

12/96. osteosarcoma of the temporal fossa with hemorrhagic presentation: case report.

    OBJECTIVE AND IMPORTANCE: Excluding tumors of hematopoietic origin, osteosarcomas are the most common bone tumor, although involvement of the brain or cranial base is rare. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: A 16-year-old girl with an osteosarcoma of the temporal fossa presented with an intracerebral hemorrhage. The management strategy of this lesion, including the operative interventions, is described. INTERVENTION: Several modes of treatment were undertaken, including radical resection of the cranial base lesion and excision of the cavernous sinus after a cervical internal carotid artery-to-middle cerebral artery vein bypass graft. CONCLUSION: The patient was alive and without evidence of disease 11 months after presentation but died shortly thereafter of complications related to adjuvant therapies.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.1574179411167
keywords = base
(Clic here for more details about this article)

13/96. Primary osteosarcoma of the sphenoid bone with extensive periosteal extension--case report.

    A 28-year-old male presented with a primary osteosarcoma of the sphenoid bone with extensive periosteal extension manifesting as severe headache and right exophthalmos. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging revealed an anterior middle cranial fossa tumor extending into both the orbit and the extracranial space. However, roentgenography and CT with bone windows showed no marked osteolytic changes of the sphenoid bone. Total removal of the tumor was performed via the orbitozygomatic approach. Surgery revealed that the tumor had extended periosteally without macroscopic bone destruction, but no obvious abnormalities of the skull. The histological diagnosis was osteosarcoma. The patient was treated with chemotherapy and radiation therapy, but died of tumor recurrence 10 months after the surgery.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = skull
(Clic here for more details about this article)

14/96. Bipedicled vascularized fibula flap for proximal humerus defect in a child.

    Vascularized bone transfer is becoming the most important option in the many cases in which durable, long-standing bone reconstruction is needed. The transfer of the vascularized epiphyseal plate, although controversial, is advantageous in cases where future growth is needed (i.e., congenital anomalies and tumor resections in children). The use of the free fibular head flap, based on epiphyseal blood supply augmentation, was reported using the anterior tibial artery, or part of it, as the nutritional vessel. By using both the peroneal artery and the specific branch to the fibular head as a bipedicled free flap, we ensured both long-bone fibula reconstruction and augmented blood supply to the head. We report a case of subtotal resection of the humerus due to osteosarcoma in a child that was reconstructed by this method. A preoperative study was conducted on fresh cadavers to identify the specific pedicle of the fibular head. The biceps femoris tendon was used to better stabilize the shoulder joint. The child recovered well and showed good progress in rehabilitation. On follow-up 1 year postoperatively, the shoulder joint remained limited, but showed no signs of substantial remodeling on x-ray. Good elbow and wrist-hand functions were noted. The child developed a single lung metastasis that was also removed. The question remains if the theoretical advantages in bone remodeling, shoulder stability, and bone growth are worth the extra time of surgery or the possible added donor and recipient site complications.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.07870897055835
keywords = base
(Clic here for more details about this article)

15/96. Reconstruction after total en bloc sacrectomy for osteosarcoma using a custom-made prosthesis: a technical note.

    STUDY DESIGN: A report of an innovative technique to restore the lumbosacral junction after resection of primary highly malignant osteosarcoma of the sacrum involving the whole sacrum, soft tissues, and adjacent posterior parts of both iliac wings. OBJECTIVES: To describe the planning and design of a custom-made sacral prosthesis, the surgical technique, and clinical and functional outcome of the patient. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Although there have been case reports about reconstruction methods after total sacrectomy, to date, there has not been a reported clinical case of successful reconstruction using an individual designed prosthesis based on a three-dimensional real-sized model. methods: A 42-year-old woman was referred with progressive neurologic impairment due to primary osteosarcoma of the sacrum invading surrounding structures. Based on a three-dimensional real-sized model, a detailed surgical plan was developed to assure safe, wide surgical margins. In addition, the model enabled design and testing of a custom-made sacral prosthesis, to provide stable lumbosacral reconstruction. RESULTS: After induction chemotherapy, a staged anteroposterior resection-reconstruction was successfully performed. After surgery, a superficial wound dehiscence was promptly treated. Within 3 weeks after surgery, mobilization began, and the adjuvant chemotherapy was continued. At the 36-month follow-up, the patient was disease free, had a stable, painless spinopelvic junction, and could walk short distances using ankle orthoses and crutches. Radiographs show complete incorporation of the pelvic grafts and unchanged position of the implant. CONCLUSIONS: In planning and performing a total sacrectomy, including substantial parts of iliac wings, a three-dimensional real-sized model offers surgeons distinct advantages. Wide bony resection margins can be drawn on the model, and an individual custom-made prosthesis to re-establish spinopelvic continuity can be designed and tested before the intervention.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.07870897055835
keywords = base
(Clic here for more details about this article)

16/96. Osteogenic sarcoma after retinoblastoma radiotherapy.

    Development of osteogenic sarcoma after retinoblastoma radiotherapy in three patients, two of whom were siblings, is reported. Pluridirectional tomography and plain skull radiography demonstrated soft tissue masses, sinus opacification, and bone destruction and sclerosis in all three patients. Computed tomography reliably indicated the presence or absence of intracranial tumor extension in the two patients in whom it was performed. Radionuclide bone scanning was a useful adjunct for osteosarcomatous detection.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = skull
(Clic here for more details about this article)

17/96. Primary osteogenic sarcoma of a finger proximal phalanx: a case report and literature review.

    Osteogenic sarcoma of the small bones of the hand is rare with only 15 cases documented. We describe a 12-year-old boy with an osteogenic sarcoma of the proximal phalanx of the middle finger. Wide excision in the form of ray amputation with a wide surgical margin was performed after neoadjuvant chemotherapy consisting of combined high-dose methotrexate, doxorubicin, ifosfamide, and cisplatin. To restore maximum function the index ray was transferred to the base of the third metacarpal. Adjuvant chemotherapy was administered subsequently. At 28-month follow-up evaluation there was no evidence of local recurrence of disease or distant metastasis and both function and appearance were good.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.07870897055835
keywords = base
(Clic here for more details about this article)

18/96. Bizarre parosteal osteochondromatous proliferation: case report and review of the literature.

    Bizarre parosteal osteochondromatous proliferation of bone (BPOP) is a benign lesion that is occasionally misinterpreted as a malignant process. The original reports described lesions exclusively in the hands and feet. However, subsequent reports have included additional sites in the long bones, skull, and maxilla. The differential diagnosis of BPOP includes numerous benign and malignant lesions. The benign differential diagnosis includes osteochondroma and reactive processes. The most important malignant differential diagnosis is parosteal osteosarcoma. We present a case of an 11-year-old boy with recurrent BPOP and review the literature. We discuss the differential diagnosis and pathogenesis of the lesion.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = skull
(Clic here for more details about this article)

19/96. Parosteal osteosarcoma of the skull.

    Parosteal osteosarcoma of the skull is a distinct surface bone tumor, with a better prognosis than conventional osteosarcoma. The most common location is on the surface of the distal femur which accounts for 46-66% of the cases. The presentation in the skull is uncommon and there are few cases reported in the literature. We describe the case of a man who developed a parosteal osteosarcoma arising from the occipital bone with extension to the parietal bone. The patient was operated and had a complete tumor resection.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 6
keywords = skull
(Clic here for more details about this article)

20/96. Effects of stereotactic radiosurgery on metastatic brain tumors of various histopathologies.

    Although reports have been published describing clinical results in a large series of patients with metastatic brain tumors treated by stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), clinical neuropathological correlation has rarely been available. The present paper describes three autopsy cases and one surgical case treated with linear accelerator based radiosurgery. The cases comprised a lung cancer, a rectal cancer, an osteosarcoma, and a malignant melanoma. Histological sections of each tumor were analyzed by light microscopy based on the Ohosi and Shimosato's histopathological classification of the effects of radiation therapy. In three cases (pulmonary squamous cell carcinoma, rectal adenocarcinoma and osteosarcoma), a large area of the tumors consisted of coagulation necrosis and non-viable tumor cells, while coagulation necrosis and non-viable tumor cells comprised a very small part of the malignant melanoma. Histopathological type of the metastatic brain tumor may be one of the factors influencing outcome after SRS.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.1574179411167
keywords = base
(Clic here for more details about this article)
<- Previous || Next ->


Leave a message or picture about "Osteosarcoma" or enter the forum:



We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.
Last update: April 2009
Statistics