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Cases reported "Lacerations"

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1/46. The abdominal compartment syndrome: a report of 3 cases including instance of endocrine induction.

    Three patients with the abdominal compartment syndrome are presented and discussed. In one of the patients the condition was induced in an endocrine fashion, since trauma was sustained exclusively by the middle third of the left leg. The development of the syndrome as a remote effect of local trauma has never been reported previously. In all three instances only insignificant amounts of intraperitoneal fluid was found and the increase in abdominal pressure was due to severe edema of the mesentery and retroperitoneum. Since the condition is highly lethal, early diagnosis is imperative, and this starts by carrying a high index of suspicion. Measurement of the intraperitoneal pressure easily confirms this diagnosis. It is emphasized that measurements at various sites, like bladder and stomach, in each patient is essential to confirm the diagnosis, since one of the sites may be rendered unreliable due to intraperitoneal processes impinging on the affected site and affecting its distensibility.
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ranking = 1
keywords = trauma
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2/46. Disseminated cystic lymphangiomatosis presenting with acute abdomen: report of a case and review of the literature.

    lymphangioma is an uncommon tumor. Lymphangiomatosis, a benign tumor consisting of a cluster of dilated lymphatic channels, is very unusual. Most lymphangiomatoses are found in the neck and head area. Less than 5% are diagnosed intraabdominally and they are very infrequently encountered in the retroperitoneal area. Herein, we report a rare case of a 32 year-old woman who had disseminated intra-abdominal and retroperitoneal cystic lymphangiomatosis, which presented as acute abdomen. She received exploratory laparotomy due to the suspicion of malignancy, which was finally confirmed as cystic lymphangiomatosis. The clinical manifestations, imaging features, and management of this patient are discussed and compared with previous literature.
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ranking = 0.03254348291015
keywords = head
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3/46. Abdominal distention and shock in an infant.

    Acute abdominal distention in the pediatric patient may be attributable to extraperitoneal fluid, masses, organomegaly, air, an ileus, a functional or mechanical bowel obstruction, or injury and blood secondary to trauma. An infant who presents to the emergency department with acute abdominal distention and shock is a true emergency for which the differential diagnosis is extensive. An unusual case of abdominal distention, ascites, hematochezia, and shock in an infant, subsequently found to have spontaneous perforation of the common bile duct is reported. This uncommon cause of abdominal distention and shock in an infant is many times left out of the differential diagnosis of an acute abdomen. The presentation may be as an uncommon acute form or a classis subacute type. This patient had hematochezia, which had not been previously reported in association with this entity. Failure to recognize and treat an acute abdomen can result in high mortality.
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ranking = 4.8445198154832
keywords = injury, trauma
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4/46. Inflammatory (pseudosarcomatous) myofibroblastic tumor of the urinary bladder causing acute abdominal pain.

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor is a reactive proliferation of myofibroblasts that rarely involves the urinary bladder. The cause of inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor is unknown but may represent an initial reactive process to an infectious agent or trauma that transforms into neoplastic growth. Cases reported in children, however, often lack any preexisting bladder pathology. The authors present a case in a young child that presented as acute abdominal pain. In general, these tumors follow a benign clinical course after resection, although close monitoring is essential given the rarity of this bladder lesion.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = trauma
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5/46. Idiopathic segmental infarction of the greater omentum successfully treated by laparoscopy: report of case.

    Idiopathic or spontaneous segmental infarction of the greater omentum (ISIGO) is a rare cause of acute right-sided abdominal pain. The symptoms simulate acute appendicitis in 66% of cases and cholecystitis in 22%. Progressive peritonitis usually dictates laparotomy, and an accurate diagnosis is rarely made before surgery. The etiology of the hemorrhagic necrosis is unknown, but predisposing factors such as anatomic variations in the blood supply to the right free omental end, obesity, trauma, overeating, coughing, and a sudden change in position may play a role in the pathogenesis. We present herein the case of a 37-year-old man in whom ISIGO, precipitated by obesity and overeating, was successfully diagnosed and treated by laparoscopy. Resection of the necrotic part of the greater omentum is the therapy of choice, and ensures fast recovery and pain control. Serohemorrhagic ascites is a common finding in ISIGO, and careful exploration of the whole abdominal cavity should be performed. The laparoscopic approach allows both exploration and surgical intervention.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = trauma
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6/46. Sigmoid colon rupture secondary to Crede's method in a patient with spinal cord injury.

    Crede's method is a manual suprapubic pressure exerted with a clenched fist or fingers, used to initiate micturition, in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) who have neurovesical dysfunction. It is usually a benign maneuver unassociated with any major complications. This paper will illustrate a case report involving a sigmoid colon rupture secondary to Crede's method in a patient with SCI. Various techniques of Crede's method are briefly described. It is recommended that patients with quadriplegia avoid forceful use of Crede's method, as it may cause contusion of the abdominal wall and injuries to internal viscera, possibly leading to colonic rupture. It is believed that this is the first reported case of such an unusual complication of Crede's method in patients with SCI.
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ranking = 21.722599077416
keywords = injury
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7/46. Omental infarction as a delayed complication of abdominal surgery.

    Omental infarction, an uncommon cause of acute abdominal pain, is the result of compromised perfusion to the greater omentum. Although its etiology remains uncertain, predisposing factors include obesity [Surg. Today 30 (2000) 451], strenuous activity [N. Z. Med. J. 111 (1998) 211], trauma, and idiopathic omental torsion. Often confused with acute appendicitis or cholecystitis on clinical grounds [Surg. Today 30 (2000) 451], its diagnosis has traditionally been one of exclusion, based on intraoperative and pathologic findings. This diagnosis can be made radiologically based on the characteristic findings of an inflammatory mass containing fat and fluid. We describe a case of right lower quadrant omental infarction temporally related to bowel surgery.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = trauma
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8/46. capnocytophaga canimorsus sepsis presenting as an acute abdomen in an asplenic patient.

    Acute abdominal symptoms are frequently caused by surgical intra-abdominal problems. However, the differential diagnosis also includes several internal diseases. Overwhelming infections may present with acute abdominal signs, particularly in the immunocompromised host. Asplenic patients are highly susceptible to infections with encapsulated bacteria such as streptococcus pneumoniae, haemophilus influenzae and neisseria meningitidis. Severe infections due to capnocytophaga canimorsus (DF2), are also common in this group. C. canimorsus is a Gram-negative rod, present as a commensal organism in cat and dog saliva. We describe the atypical presentation of a fatal C. canimorsus-sepsis in a 46-year-old man, who underwent traumatic splenectomy two decades earlier.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = trauma
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9/46. Delayed splenic rupture: an unusual cause of acute surgical abdomen.

    Authors describe an unusual case of acute abdomen after the traffic injury. They remind correct diagnosis of delayed splenic rupture and compare it with other literature findings.
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ranking = 4.3445198154832
keywords = injury
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10/46. Fulminant ischaemic colitis with atypical clinical features complicating sickle cell disease.

    Clinically significant ischaemic bowel injury is an exceedingly rare complication of sickle cell disease. It manifests as acute surgical abdomen and may respond to conservative treatment. An unusual fatal case of ischaemic colitis with minimal abdominal findings in a young male during a sickle cell vaso-occlusive pain crisis is described. This case demonstrates that an acute surgical abdomen should be considered in such patients who fail to respond to conservative management as untreated this condition may be fatal.
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ranking = 4.3445198154832
keywords = injury
(Clic here for more details about this article)
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Last update: April 2009
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