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Cases reported "Hemoperitoneum"

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1/4. Acute abdomen in infants of adolescent mothers: diagnostic challenges.

    Caring for children of adolescent parents presents unique challenges. Because adolescent parents may lack parenting skills and knowledge of medical terminology, symptoms of life-threatening illnesses may be misinterpreted. We present two cases of unexpected acute abdomen in young infants with adolescent mothers. The first case involves midgut volvulus, which was discovered during a routine newborn visit. The second case, involving pyloric stenosis, presented a clinical management challenge when the adolescent mother refused diagnostic studies.
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ranking = 1
keywords = newborn
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2/4. Acute abdomen due to late retroperitoneal extravasation from a femoral venous catheter in a newborn.

    CONTEXT: The use of parenteral nutrition via a central venous catheter is a common practice in the neonatal intensive care setting. Extravasation of the infusate leading to an acute abdomen is a complication that has only rarely been documented. This report describes the case of a premature infant with a femoral catheter placed in the inferior vena cava, who developed an acute abdomen as a result of late retroperitoneal extravasation of parenteral nutrition. CASE REPORT: A pre-term infant receiving total parenteral nutrition via a femoral venous catheter developed an acute abdomen five days after the catheter placement. Extravascular catheter migration to the retroperitoneal space and extravasation of the infusate was diagnosed by contrast injection. Withdrawal of the catheter was followed by prompt cessation of the signs and full recovery from the acute abdomen, without the need for surgery. A review of the literature is presented, emphasizing the clinical and therapeutic aspects of this unusual complication from femoral venous catheterization and parenteral nutrition.
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ranking = 4
keywords = newborn
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3/4. Spontaneous rupture of extrahepatic choledochal cyst: two pediatric cases and literature review.

    Spontaneous rupture of extrahepatic choledochal cysts is very rare. Neonatal cases generally present with biliary ascites, and older children with acute abdomen. Although the cause is unclear, accumulation of protein plugs in an anomalous pancreaticobiliary junction, irritation of the cyst wall due to reflux of pancreatic juice, and weakness due to a developmental error such as common channel syndrome have all been suggested to play contributing roles. The treatment of choice is complete excision of the cyst and hepatico-jejunostomy. In newborns who are in a poor condition, the primary treatment should be simple peritoneal drainage.
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ranking = 1
keywords = newborn
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4/4. Combination of "patch, drain, and wait" and home total parenteral nutrition for midgut volvulus with massive ischemia/necrosis.

    The successful use of a combination of "patch, drain, and wait" (PDW) and home total parenteral nutrition (TPN) in the management of a case of acute, catastrophic midgut volvulus in a 2-year-11-month-old boy with near-total ischemia/necrosis of his small intestine is reported. The PDW approach to the highly effective management of acute midgut ischemia/necrosis in infancy and childhood (necrotizing enterocolitis and midgut volvulus) involves maximum gut salvage by avoidance of resection, stoma formation, or both through the use of extensive peritoneal cavity drainage by Penrose drains, TPN, and broad-spectrum antibiotics. The extensive peritoneal drainage fosters capture of enteric fistulas with the formation of enterostomies at drain exit sites, while adhesions and ischemia/inflammation-induced hypervascular obliteration of the peritoneal cavity diminish the potential for peritonitis (no peritoneal cavity, no peritonitis) and facilitate impressive salvage of seemingly hopelessly lost ischemic/necrotic gut (a simulation of the in utero ischemic gut process leading to atresias and some varying, but generally mild, gut loss) while simultaneously contributing to the resorption of absolutely non-salvageable gut and the creation of a remarkably clean and adhesion-free peritoneal cavity resembling that of a newborn infant with midgut intestinal atresia.
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ranking = 1
keywords = newborn
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Last update: April 2009
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