Cases reported "Curcuma"

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1/136. Old and new infarction of an epiploic appendage: ultrasound mimicry of appendicitis.

    Epiploic appendagitis is a self-limiting disease. Depending on its location, it may simulate nearly any acute abdominal condition. The ultrasound and computed tomographic (CT) features are characteristic, enabling ready diagnosis and thus preventing an unnecessary laparotomy. We describe a patient with acute abdominal pain in the right lower quadrant, in whom the combination of an old and fresh infarction of an epiploic appendage simulated appendicitis on ultrasound. Subsequent CT examination made the correct diagnosis.
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2/136. A case of urachal remnant presenting as acute abdominal pain.

    A 30-year-old male presented to the Emergency Department, over sequential visits, with abdominal complaints. The patient's presenting history and physical examination were mistakenly diagnosed variously as gastroenteritis, omphalitis, and appendicitis. Ultimately, the diagnosis of urachal fistula was made at surgery. This case is discussed in light of prior published experiences with this disease entity.
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3/136. Acute abdominal pain as a leading symptom for Degos' disease (malignant atrophic papulosis).

    We report a case of a 16-yr-old white female patient with acute abdominal pain due to visceral involvement of Degos' disease that required extensive small bowel resection. skin manifestations of her disease had been present for 2 yr before the correct diagnosis. She died as a result of central nervous system involvement from Degos' disease.
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4/136. Acute abdomen as an atypical presentation of meningococcal septicaemia.

    The clinical manifestations and course of meningococcal disease have been well described, but atypical presentations may, if unrecognized, lead to a delay in treatment. We describe here an unusual case of this disease in a 21-y-old woman who presented with an acute rigid abdomen, clinical and laboratory features of sepsis, shock and early DIC with no indication of meningococcal infection. She developed a rapidly spreading purpuric rash, conjunctival haemorrhages, hypotension and tachycardia and a low urine output. Laboratory investigations showed a low platelet count, low haemoglobin and normal WBC. A presumptive diagnosis of meningococcal septicaemia was made and recovery followed treatment with cefotaxime, fluids and inotropes. A fully sensitive neisseria meningitis Group C, type 2a, subtype NT was isolated from blood cultures, but not from CSF obtained after antibiotic treatment.
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5/136. Pyogenic liver abscess as a cause of acute upper abdominal pain. A report of two cases.

    The clinical course of 2 patients with acute abdominal pain, which was eventually found to be due to pyogenic hepatic abscesses is described. One patient, operated on late in the course, died; the other, who was operated on early, recovered. The importance of considering this life-threatening disease in the differential diagnosis of acute abdominal pain is emphasized.
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6/136. Accidentally delayed diagnosis of ruptured ovarian carcinoma in a young woman: a care report.

    Ovarian carcinoma commonly occurs in postmenopausal women and often presents with an insidious course. Acute abdomen is rarely an initial symptom. When these patients present with abdominal discomfort, the disease has already spread throughout the peritoneal cavity. We present a case of mucinous cystadenocarcinoma in a young woman who presented with acute abdomen and intra-abdominal bleeding. This 24-year-old woman was previously diagnosed with a ruptured left ovarian cystic tumor at a primary clinic. She underwent emergency exploratory laparotomy, followed by unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy at the clinic. No thorough examination of the peritoneal cavity was done during surgery. The diagnosis of mucinous cystadenocarcinoma was accidentally over-looked until one month later when she returned for routine follow-up. Upon referral to our clinic, the patient underwent a repeat laparotomy. The surgicopathologic diagnosis was intraperitoneal carcinomatosis stage IIIC that could not be excised completely, even though rigorous staging surgery including washing cytology, total abdominal hysterectomy, salpingo-oophorectomy, retroperitoneal lymphadenectomy, appendectomy, infracolic omentectomy and excision of any suspicious and removable lesions were performed. This case alerts us to consider the possibility of ovarian malignancy when a young woman presents with an acute abdomen secondary to ruptured ovarian cystic tumor and intraperitoneal hemorrhage. Careful preoperative preparation and thorough intrasurgical examination of the peritoneal cavity along with a prompt pathologic diagnosis of suspicious lesions will prevent missed diagnoses.
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7/136. An unusual presentation of gestational trophoblastic disease.

    We report a case of gestational trophoblastic disease leading to an acute abdomen due to a haemoperitoneum in a young multipara.
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8/136. Retroperitoneal teratoma presenting as acute abdomen in an elderly person.

    A 56-year-old man presented with acute abdomen. Clinically, he was diagnosed as having perigastric abscess. On exploration, a retroperitoneal cystic teratoma was encountered. Postoperatively, he recovered uneventfully and has no residual disease two years later.
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9/136. Acute abdominal complications of coeliac disease.

    Two rare complications of coeliac disease are described in patients who presented as acute abdominal emergencies. One of the patients had both oesophageal and small intestinal obstruction produced by an ulcerative process involving these portions of the gastro-intestinal tract. The other, a patient with long standing dermatitis herpetiformis, perforated his small intestine at a site involved by both a lymphoma and partial villous atrophy.
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10/136. Spontaneous uterine perforation of pyometra. A report of three cases.

    BACKGROUND: Spontaneous perforation of pyometra is a rare cause of generalized peritonitis; only 17 cases have been reported. CASES: Three cases of spontaneous perforation of pyometra occurred; two were associated with carcinoma of the cervix. All were treated with exploratory laparotomy and drainage. The first patient died of recurrent carcinoma of the cervix five months after laparotomy. The second patient died of septic shock shortly after the operation. The third patient made a good postoperative recovery. CONCLUSION: pyometra is a serious medical condition, because of both its association with malignant disease and the danger of spontaneous perforation, which carries significant morbidity and mortality. Although rare, ruptured pyometra should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute abdomen in elderly women, especially those with malignant disorders of the genital tract. The treatment of pyometra rupture is immediate laparotomy, peritoneal lavage and drainage, or simple hysterectomy.
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Last update: September 2014