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Cases reported "Cerebellar Ataxia"

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1/7. Ataxic quadriparesis due to bilateral capsular infarcts.

    A most unusual case of ataxic quadriparesis due to bilateral infarcts involving the posterior capsule-corona radiata region is reported. The literature concerning ataxic hemiparesis is briefly discussed.
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keywords = radiata
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2/7. Capsular ataxic tetraparesis.

    A 42-year-old man with ataxic tetraparesis is reported. Computerized tomography showed bilateral and symmetrical lacunar infarcts at the junctions of the posterior limb of the internal capsule and the corona radiata. Previously this clinical syndrome had been reported only with a lesion in the pons.
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keywords = radiata
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3/7. Ataxic-hemiparesis, localization and clinical features.

    Five additional cases of ataxic-hemiparesis are reported. In 3 cases, computed tomography showed an area of decreased attenuation in the posterior limb of the internal capsule, and in 1 case, 2 areas of attenuation in the corona radiata. A review of previously reported cases suggest that brainstem ataxic-hemiparesis may be separated from supratentorial forms of ataxic-hemiparesis by the presence of nystagmus, dysarthria, cranial neuropathy, and the absence of sensory abnormality.
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keywords = radiata
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4/7. Ataxic hemiparesis from lesions of the corona radiata.

    Ipsilateral cerebellar and pyramidal signs suddenly developed in three patients. Computed tomography revealed small infarcts of the corona radiata in two patients and a small infarct in the posterior limb of the internal capsule in the third. Ataxic hemiparesis can result from lesions of the corona radiata as well as many other points along the corticopontine pathways.
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keywords = radiata
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5/7. Homolateral ataxia and crural paresis: a crossed cerebral-cerebellar diaschisis.

    A patient developed weakness of the right leg and homolateral ataxia of the arm, caused by a subcortical infarct in the area supplied by the anterior cerebral artery in the left paracentral region, demonstrated by CT and MRI. Cerebral blood flow studied by technetium-labelled hexamethyl-propylene-amine oxime using single photon emission computed tomography showed decreased blood flow in the left lateral frontal cortex and in the right cerebellar hemisphere ("crossed cerebral-cerebellar diaschisis"). The homolateral ataxia of the arm may be caused by decreased function of the right cerebellar hemisphere, because of a lesion of the corticopontine-cerebellar tracts, whereas crural hemiparesis is caused by a lesion of the upper part of the corona radiata.
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keywords = radiata
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6/7. Parieto-cerebellar loop impairment in ataxic hemiparesis: proposed pathophysiology based on an analysis of cerebral blood flow.

    Sixteen stroke patients suffering from ataxic hemiparesis syndrome were studied with regional cerebral blood flow measured by 133-xenon inhalation technique (12 patients) and by SPECT (HMPAO) (9 patients). The causative lesions (hematoma in 7 and infarct in 9), unilateral in 15 patients and bilateral in 1, were located in the posterior two-thirds of the corona radiata, thalamo-capsular and subthalamus regions, or cerebral peduncle. Ataxia of the cerebellar type was unilateral in 15 patients and bilateral in 1 with similar, deep, bilateral causative lesions. Four patients presented some characteristics of proprioceptive ataxia (mixed ataxia). Associated cognitive disturbances were present in 9 patients and absent in 7. Eleven of the 12 subjects studied by 133-xenon inhalation technique showed limited centro-parietal hypoperfusion, mainly in the inferior parietal lobule, ipsilateral to the causative lesion and bilaterally in the patient with bilateral lesions and ataxia. Ipsilateral hypoperfusion was confirmed in 7/9 patients studied by SPECT, which also demonstrated contralateral cerebellar hypoperfusion in 4 patients. These findings suggest that ataxic hemiparesis syndrome results from functional depression (diaschisis) consequent to the interruption at many levels of an "inferior parietal associative cortex-cerebellar anterior lobe" circuit.
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keywords = radiata
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7/7. cerebellar ataxia in ataxic hemiparesis? A kinematic and EMG analysis.

    It has recently been proposed that the ataxia in ataxic hemiparesis is a clumsiness common to all patients with hemiparesis and not indicative of any involvement of corticopontocerebellar or cerebellocortical pathways. In disagreement with this view, we report here that a patient with ataxic hemiparesis, following a lesion of the corona radiata, showed the disorders in kinematic and electromyographic (EMG) parameters of goal-directed movements that have recently been demonstrated to be characteristic of patients with cerebellar lesions. This suggests involvement of corticopontocerebellar or cerebellocortical pathways in ataxic hemiparesis.
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keywords = radiata
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Last update: April 2009
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