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Cases reported "Bursitis"

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1/77. Case report: portal vein thrombosis associated with hereditary protein c deficiency: a report of two cases.

    protein c deficiency is one of the causes of curable or preventable portal vein thrombosis. We report two patients of portal vein thrombosis associated with hereditary protein c deficiency. The first patient presented with continuous right upper quadrant pain and high fever. The abdominal sonography revealed normal liver parenchyma but portal vein and superior mesenteric vein thrombosis. Based on a 55% (normal 70-140%) plasma protein C level, he was diagnosed as having protein c deficiency. A trace of his family history showed that his elder brother also had protein c deficiency with a 50% plasma C level. Both patients received anticoagulant therapy. The younger brother showed good response. Unfortunately, the elder one suffered from recurrent episodes of variceal bleeding and received a life-saving splenectomy and devascularization. We herein remind clinicians that early screening and therapy are helpful in preventing late complications of protein c deficiency with portal vein thrombosis.
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2/77. gallbladder torsion: case report and review of 245 cases reported in the Japanese literature.

    We report here a case of torsion of the gallbladder in a 73-year-old woman. The patient was admitted to our hospital with right hypochondralgia. ultrasonography and computed tomography demonstrated a distended gallbladder, with a multilayered wall, which contained no stones. Since the symptoms did not respond to antibiotics, laparotomy was performed. The gallbladder was found to be twisted around its pedicle and to be gangrenous. cholecystectomy was performed, and the patient had an uneventful postoperative course. We also reviewed 245 cases reported in the Japanese literature. The clinical features of gallbladder torsion, which include low frequency of fever and jaundice, poor response to antibiotic therapy, and acute onset of abdominal pain, may be helpful in the differential diagnosis from acute cholecystitis. Moreover, a highly suggestive sign of gallbladder torsion observed by ultrasonography or computed tomography is a markedly enlarged "floating" gallbladder with a continuous hypoechoic line indicating edematous change in the wall.
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3/77. Acute abdomen and lupus enteritis: thrombocytopenia and pneumatosis intestinalis as indicators for surgery.

    Bowel symptoms occur often in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), but enteric complications in patients on steroid therapy are rare. We report a case of a 14-year-old Mexican girl with SLE on high-dose steroid therapy complicated by abdominal vasculitis and small bowel perforation. Accompanying this serious complication were thrombocytopenia and radiographic changes of pneumatosis intestinalis. These findings suggested necrotizing enteritis and prompted urgent surgery. Four jejunal perforations, pneumatosis intestinalis, and submucosal vasculitis were present in the resected specimen. Persistent SLE activity responded to cyclophosphamide, which is indicated in patients with digestive symptoms who fail to respond to high-dose steroids.
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4/77. streptococcus pneumoniae peritonitis postpartum.

    A peritonitis caused by an ascending infection is a rare complication postpartum. A 37-year-old woman presented with a secondary peritonitis due to streptococcus pneumoniae. The patient had given birth to a healthy boy 4 weeks before and showed no symptoms of a bronchitis on admission. An operation was performed after the patient developed an acute abdomen, showing a diffuse peritonitis. High vaginal swabs and blood cultures taken on admission were positive for S. pneumoniae as well as the specimen taken during the operation. Thus we concluded that this was a case of an ascending infection. After antibiotic therapy with penicillin the patient could be discharged 8 days after the operation.
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5/77. Idiopathic segmental infarction of the greater omentum successfully treated by laparoscopy: report of case.

    Idiopathic or spontaneous segmental infarction of the greater omentum (ISIGO) is a rare cause of acute right-sided abdominal pain. The symptoms simulate acute appendicitis in 66% of cases and cholecystitis in 22%. Progressive peritonitis usually dictates laparotomy, and an accurate diagnosis is rarely made before surgery. The etiology of the hemorrhagic necrosis is unknown, but predisposing factors such as anatomic variations in the blood supply to the right free omental end, obesity, trauma, overeating, coughing, and a sudden change in position may play a role in the pathogenesis. We present herein the case of a 37-year-old man in whom ISIGO, precipitated by obesity and overeating, was successfully diagnosed and treated by laparoscopy. Resection of the necrotic part of the greater omentum is the therapy of choice, and ensures fast recovery and pain control. Serohemorrhagic ascites is a common finding in ISIGO, and careful exploration of the whole abdominal cavity should be performed. The laparoscopic approach allows both exploration and surgical intervention.
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6/77. 'Acute abdomen' with a rash.

    A previously fit and healthy 17-year-old male presented with the clinical symptoms and signs of an acute abdomen and with the secondary complaint of a rash. In view of the primary presenting complaint he was admitted to the surgical ward. The patient was initially booked for an emergency exploratory laparotomy, but after reassessment on the ward a clinical diagnosis of meningococcal septicaemia was made. The patient was treated medically with intravenous antibiotics and supportive therapy, and made a complete recovery. Medical causes of abdominal pain, as exemplified here, can be more life threatening than surgical causes and should be considered in all patients.
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7/77. Eosinophilic gastroenteritis mimicking acute appendicitis.

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is a rare entity that can be treated successfully with glucocorticoid therapy if the appropriate diagnosis is made. However, it may present with symptomatology mimicking acute surgical conditions. We present the case of a 26-year-old man who presented with diffuse epigastric pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Extensive workup including upper endoscopy and imaging study revealed gastritis with ulcer and ascites. The patient developed right lower quadrant pain with localized peritonitis and leukocytosis. He underwent appendectomy and small bowel biopsy. pathology revealed eosinophilic cellular infiltrate of both the appendiceal and small intestinal wall. The unique features of this condition are reviewed and surgical approaches are discussed.
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8/77. Laparoscopically assisted treatment of acute abdomen in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    The incidence of abdominal pain in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is very high. Most patients do not require surgical treatment (serositis). Some cases such as appendicitis, perforated ulcer, cholecystitis or, rarely, intestinal infarction are surgical. Differential diagnosis is difficult, partly because noninvasive examinations do not provide enough evidence to rule out a diagnosis. On the other hand, in patients with SLE who have acute abdomen, it is dangerous to delay surgery by attempting conservative therapy. In fact, a better survival rate has been associated with early laparotomy. We report a case of acute abdomen in a patient affected by SLE, in which the diagnostic problem was solved by means of laparoscopy and the treatment was laparoscopically assisted. A 45-year-old woman with a 25-year history of SLE was admitted with abdominal pain and fever. Her physical examination revealed a painful right iliac fossa with rebound tenderness. Her WBC count was normal. Abdominal x-ray, ultrasonography, paracentesis, and peritoneal lavage did not provide a diagnosis. A diagnostic laparoscopy was performed, showing segmentary small bowel necrosis. The incision of the umbilical port site was enlarged to allow a small laparatomy, and a small bowel resection was performed. The histopathologic finding was "leucocytoclasic vasculitis, with infarction of the intestinal wall." The patient recovered uneventfully. In conclusion, this case report shows that emergency diagnostic laparoscopy is feasible and useful for acute abdomen in SLE. Currently, this diagnostic possibility could be considered the technique of choice in these cases, partly because, when necessary, it also can allow for mini-invasive treatment therapy.
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9/77. Synchronous first manifestation of an idiopathic eosinophilic gastroenteritis and bronchial asthma.

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is a rare disease of the gastrointestinal tract in which the eosinophils seem to play an important role in the inflammation of the gut wall. We report on a case with a synchronous first manifestation of eosinophilic gastroenteritis and bronchial asthma, which also occurred synchronously in all further episodes. The diagnosis was first made at the end of the second episode during which the patient lost more than 13 kg in weight. Under steroid therapy, symptoms of both diseases disappeared quickly in the third episode. We assume that participation of the gastrointestinal tract in patients with bronchial asthma occurs more frequently than expected. In asthma patients with abdominal symptomatology, eosinophilic gastroenteritis should also be considered.
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10/77. Rectus sheath hematoma in an elderly woman under anti-coagulant therapy.

    Rectal sheath hematoma has been a well-known clinical entity from the ruin of the ancient greece. It is relatively rare, however, to encounter this abdominal disorder in the clinical setting. Furthermore, the initial symptoms of rectus sheath hematoma are often similar to those of acute abdominal disorders. Therefore, the majority of the patients with rectus sheath hematoma have been treated with operative procedures because of the difficulty of a differential diagnosis from other abdominal disorders. We recently treated a 74-year female diagnosed with rectus sheath hematoma with the anticoagulants after an episode of cerebral infarction. From the findings of the physical examinations, ultrasound, and computed tomography, we could correctly diagnose, and could treat her with completely conservative methods without any invasive techniques. It is stressed that it is important to recognize this entity of rectus sheath hematoma when patients are examined, after complaining of acute abdominal pain and with evidence abdominal masses in the clinical setting.
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Last update: April 2009
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