Cases reported "Bursitis"

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1/44. Adhesive capsulitis of the hip after bilateral adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder.

    Adhesive capsulitis of the hip is a not a common clinical presentation. We report a case of adhesive capsulitis of the hip in a patient with hypothyroidism and previous adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder who was receiving thyroid-hormone replacement. The adhesive capsulitis of both hip and shoulder were treated successfully with physical therapy. Orthopedic surgeons should be aware of this diagnosis and its association with shoulder adhesive capsulitis and thyroid dysfunction, to allow them to recognize it and intervene early.
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2/44. Bursal sporotrichosis: case report and review.

    We describe a patient whose prepatellar bursa was infected with sporothrix schenckii. The infection persisted despite itraconazole therapy and cure was achieved only after surgical excision of the bursa. A review of treatments for bursal sporotrichosis is presented.
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3/44. Adhesive capsulitis of shoulder and treatment with protease inhibitors in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection: report of 8 cases.

    OBJECTIVE: To describe our experience with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients receiving protease inhibitor therapy who presented with adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder. methods: Between July 1996 and December 1999, 8 HIV-infected patients (7 male) treated with protease inhibitors who presented with adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder were retrospectively identified. diagnosis of adhesive capsulitis relied on clinical features including shoulder pain and both active and passive restricted range of motion (ROM). All available clinical and radiographic data were reviewed. RESULTS: Onset of symptoms was insidious, and at presentation, patients complained of shoulder pain, which was bilateral in 4 of the 8 cases. physical examination showed global restriction of active and passive ROM of the glenohumeral joint. The mean delay between initiation of hiv protease inhibitors and onset of shoulder pain was 14 months (range 2 to 36). The protease inhibitor therapy always included indinavir. No underlying condition associated with secondary adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder, including shoulder trauma, diabetes mellitus, thyroid disease, pulmonary or cardiac diseases could be identified. In all 8 patients, despite continuation of therapy with indinavir, both shoulder pain and restricted ROM completely resolved, after a mean disease course of 7.4 months. CONCLUSION: Adhesive capsulitis of shoulder seems to be a new adverse event of HIV protease inhibitor therapy. In all reported cases, patients were treated with indinavir. Further observations will be necessary to confirm adhesive capsulitis as a side effect.
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ranking = 4
keywords = therapy
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4/44. bursitis due to Mycobacterium goodii, a recently described, rapidly growing mycobacterium.

    We report a case of olecranon bursitis due to Mycobacterium goodii in a 60-year-old man. Prior to recognition of his infection, he received intrabursal steroids and underwent olecranon bursectomy. His infection was cured with antimicrobial therapy consisting of doxycycline and ciprofloxacin. This case illustrates that previously unrecognized members of the mycobacterium smegmatis group of mycobacteria have pathogenic potential.
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keywords = therapy
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5/44. Physical therapy for spinal accessory nerve injury complicated by adhesive capsulitis.

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The authors found no literature describing adhesive capsulitis as a consequence of spinal accessory nerve injury and no exercise program or protocol for patients with spinal accessory nerve injury. The purpose of this case report is to describe the management of a patient with adhesive capsulitis and spinal accessory nerve injury following a carotid endarterectomy. CASE DESCRIPTION: The patient was a 67-year-old woman referred for physical therapy following manipulation of the left shoulder and a diagnosis of adhesive capsulitis by her orthopedist. Spinal accessory nerve injury was identified during the initial physical therapy examination, and a program of neuromuscular electrical stimulation was initiated. OUTCOMES: The patient had almost full restoration of the involved muscle function after 5 months of physical therapy. DISCUSSION: This case report illustrates the importance of accurate diagnosis and suggests physical therapy intervention to manage adhesive capsulitis as a consequence of spinal accessory nerve injury.
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ranking = 14.30529198981
keywords = exercise, therapy
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6/44. The effects of a home exercise program on pain and perceived dysfunction in a woman with TMD: a case study.

    There are few reports analyzing the effects of exercise on patients with temporomandibular disorders. This paper presents a case study examining whether there were additional benefits from performing neuromuscular control home exercises (NMCHE) in a patient with temporomandibular disorder who was already receiving conventional treatment. A woman, 41 years of age, completed a health status questionnaire called the TMJ Scale prior to being accepted. She completed additional TMJ Scales after receiving conventional treatment and again after conventional treatment was combined with neuromuscular control home exercises. Based on the TMJ Scale's best subscore indicator of the presence or absence of a temporomandibular disorder, the patient did not derive benefit from conventional treatment without exercise. However, she received a large benefit from the addition of NMCHE. It was concluded that exercises for patients with temporomandibular disorders may be beneficial to those who do not improve with conventional treatment alone.
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ranking = 56.74762790829
keywords = exercise
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7/44. Common conditions of the achilles tendon.

    The achilles tendon, the largest tendon in the body, is vulnerable to injury because of its limited blood supply and the combination of forces to which it is subjected. aging and increased activity (particularly velocity sports) increase the chance of injury to the achilles tendon. Although conditions of the Achilles tendon are occurring with increasing frequency because the aging U.S. population is remaining active, the diagnosis is missed in about one fourth of cases. Injury onset can be gradual or sudden, and the course of healing is often lengthy. A thorough history and specific physical examination are essential to make the appropriate diagnosis and facilitate a specific treatment plan. The mainstay of treatment for tendonitis, peritendonitis, tendinosis, and retrocalcaneobursitis is ice, rest, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, but physical therapy, orthoties, and surgery may be necessary in recalcitrant cases. In patients with tendon rupture, casting or surgery is required. Appropriate treatment often leads to full recovery.
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8/44. Calcific trochanteric bursitis: resolution of calcifications and clinical remission with non-invasive treatment. A case report.

    Calcific trochanteric bursitis, a common regional pain syndrome, is characterized by chronic, intermittent aching pain over the lateral aspect of the hip and limitation of function. Effective treatment is invasive, including infiltration therapy and surgical intervention. The therapeutic effects of conservative treatment modalities have not been proven. A 59-year-old woman presented at the department of physical medicine and rehabilitation with a 2-year history of pain in the right hip. She had been treated with several agents such as glucocorticoids and local anesthetics (via injection) for two years, but without success. physical examination revealed the clinical diagnosis of bursitis trochanterica. Radiographic findings showed calcified rounded masses measuring about 1.5 cm in diameter around the greater trochanter; a calcific bursitis trochanterica was diagnosed. The patient presented for conservative treatment in order to avoid surgical intervention for removing the calcification and the bursal sac. A non-invasive treatment regimen including intensive pulsed ultrasound therapy, physiotherapy and iontophoresis was started. The conservative treatment led to a remission of both, symptoms as well as radiographic findings, which revealed complete resolution of calcifications. This case report shows that, in cases of calcific trochanteric bursitis (including those with extensive calcifications), a non-invasive conservative treatment regimen including intensive high-dosed pulsed ultrasound therapy should be attempted before more invasive treatment (injections, surgery) is considered.
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ranking = 4
keywords = therapy
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9/44. Arthroscopic management of painful and stiff scapulothoracic articulation.

    We present the case of a patient who had chronic refractory scapulothoracic pain accompanied by the loss of scapulothoracic motion. Despite intensive physical therapy, the insidious onset of scapulothoracic pain and stiffness progressed. A wide range of diagnostic tests did not show a systemic, anatomic, or neurologic cause for the disorder. Finally, the patient elected to undergo an arthroscopic release and decompression of the scapulothoracic articulation. The patient had a dramatic response to surgery; the pain was gone immediately, and by 4 months after surgery, her scapulothoracic motion was evaluated as symmetric. One year after the surgery, she maintained an active lifestyle and was extremely satisfied with the result. Progressive and painful loss of shoulder motion in the case reported was due to a rare adhesive inflammation of the scapulothoracic bursa, which was successfully treated using arthroscopic resection. arthroscopy of the scapulothoracic articulation is an option to treat scapulothoracic abnormalities, especially bursitis, but long-term clinical studies are needed to strongly recommend this emerging treatment option.
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ranking = 1
keywords = therapy
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10/44. candida arthritis. A manifestation of disseminated candidiasis.

    Fungal infections infrequently involve the joints. review of the literature reveals that candida arthritis is rare, that it is usually a complication of disseminated candidiasis and that it occurs as a primary joint infection without spread from adjacent osteomyelitis. In the patient we describe candida arthritis and bursitis of separate joints developed as a late manifestation of disseminated infection following "transient" C. tropicalis fungemia. Treatment consisting of aspiration and parenteral amphotericin b eradicated the joint infection without the need for surgery. Bursectomy, however, was required to eradicate the bursal infection. awareness of this as well as other late complications of candidemia which signify disseminated infection is important. Optimal therapy will be determined only by further clinical experience with this unusual manifestation of candida infection.
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keywords = therapy
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Last update: September 2014