Cases reported "Brain Abscess"

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21/30. brain abscess of odontogenic origin: report of case.

    Advanced dental infection rarely causes brain abscess resulting in death. Good dental hygiene and removing abscessed teeth are advised for prevention of any such occurrence. An intercranial infection is described in a 29-year-old male who also had a dental phobia.
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22/30. Intraventricular haemorrhage complicating a brain abscess.

    Intraventricular haemorrhage occurred in a patient with a parietal rim-enhancing mass on computed tomographic scan. At operation a brain abscess was identified and removed. peptostreptococcus and fusobacterium were isolated, possibly of dental origin. The possible sources of this intracranial bleeding are discussed. A neoplasm should not always be considered in the case of a cerebral ring-enhancing mass complicated with intracranial bleeding; in selected cases, brain abscess should be excluded too.
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23/30. Botryomycosis: first report of human brain involvement.

    A 57-year-old man, previously well except for dental caries and a history of wolff-parkinson-white syndrome, presented with marching right-sided motor seizures of sudden onset. Cerebral arteriography and scan demonstrated an avascular left frontal lobe mass. At operation, it was identified as an abscess and was totally excised. Histologically, granules resembling those seen in actinomycosis were demonstrated in the abscess wall, but special stains revealed gram-positive cocci in chains within and outside the granules. Fungal spores, mycelia, or branching filamentous structures were absent. Acid-fast stains were negative, and alpha-hemolytic streptococcus was recovered in pure culture from the abscess. While the patient was convalescing with penicillin therapy, a dental survey revealed the presence of periodontal abscesses which were drained by exodontia. culture of the tooth sockets showed alpha-hemolytic streptococcus and staphylococcus aureus. The literature on this relatively rare bacterial disease which histologically resembles actinomycosis is reviewed.
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24/30. meningioma associated with intratumoral abscess formation--case report.

    A rare case of meningioma associated with intratumoral abscess formation occurred in a 64-year-old female presenting with septic meningitis and a right frontal mass lesion after a gynecological operation under spinal anesthesia. The mass lesion was totally removed and revealed as an incidental meningioma with an intratumoral abscess. Hematogenous infection of bacteroides oralis was thought to be the cause of the intratumoral abscess formation.
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25/30. Abscesses of the frontal lobe of the brain secondary to covert dental sepsis.

    The bacterial species found in pus aspirated from brain abscesses in two patients were typical of those found in dental sepsis. Subsequently apical-root abscesses were demonstrated in the upper jaws of both patients. This evidence strongly suggests that these cerebral abscesses were secondary to dental sepsis which could have spread from the teeth to the frontal lobes by several possible antaomical pathways.
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26/30. Cerebral abscess complicating dental treatment. Case report and review of the literature.

    A case history and brief literature review of cerebral abscess related to dental therapy is presented. The 19-year-old male patient presented with a cerebral abscess caused by actinobacillus actinomycetamcomitans. He was otherwise healthy, and had a recent history of periodontal surgery prior to the onset of symptoms. The patient was treated successfully with stereotactic aspiration and antibiotics.
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27/30. Medical complications following successful pediatric dental treatment.

    Dental treatment is usually performed without any development of medical sequela. However, patients can acquire serious, life threatening complications, even though successful dental treatment is completed. This paper presents four case reports of medical complications following routine pediatric dental treatment. The cases include: ludwig's angina, endocarditis, brain abscess, and anesthetic toxicity. Many of the medical complications were caused by pre-existing conditions and were not necessarily direct result of dental treatment. Although medical complications following dental treatment cause grave concern, the dental practitioner can learn much from these occurrences.
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28/30. Fatal staphylococcus aureus infective endocarditis: the dental implications.

    Infective endocarditis remains an important and life-threatening infection despite improvements in diagnosis and management. There is currently a greater role for nosocomial acquisition of organisms and immunosuppression in the pathogenesis of this disease and emergence of a broader spectrum of infective organisms including those not commonly isolated from the mouth such as staphylococci. We report a case of infective endocarditis caused by staphylococcus aureus in which the patient developed disseminated intravascular coagulation and multiple septic infarcts resulting in a frontal lobe brain abscess. Multiple dental extractions were complicated by delayed postextraction hemorrhage and the immediate cause of death was abdominal hemorrhage. The dental management in infective endocarditis should be planned in consultation with the attending physician, and should take into account both the causative organism and the presence of complications. When the oral cavity cannot be proven as the bacterial source for infective endocarditis, the immediate dental management should be directed toward improving the patient's oral hygiene and providing pain relief. Definitive long-term treatment, including any extractions, is ideally delayed until the patient has fully recovered from the infective endocarditis and its attendant complications.
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29/30. Cellulitis of the eyelids associated with sinusitis and brain abscess.

    erythema in the orbital area can indicate systemic and life-threatening diseases. We experienced an unusual and serious case of orbital cellulitis that was difficult to distinguish from a case with good prognosis. A 21-year-old man developed an erythema around his eyes. He exhibited no symptoms that would suggest lesions in deep tissues, but his condition turned out to be cellulitis retrogradely metastasized from an odontogenic sinusitis traced to a dental treatment problem. Computed tomography revealed complication of a large abscess in the frontal lobe. Cellulitis of the orbital area requires particular clinical discretion.
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30/30. Type A immunoglobulin deficiency presenting as a mixed polymicrobial brain abscess: case report.

    OBJECTIVE AND IMPORTANCE: We present a case report of a patient with a left frontal brain abscess. Cultures obtained from the abscess at the time of surgery were identified as dental flora known to establish a synergistic relationship in polymicrobial infections. This type of synergistic relationship makes the clearance of an infection more difficult for an intact immune system. A serum immunoglobulin (Ig) Type A deficiency was identified postoperatively. This immunodeficiency may have contributed to the development of the abscess. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: The patient presented with headaches and photophobia. Computed tomography of the head performed with intravenously administered contrast demonstrated a left frontal brain abscess. INTERVENTION: The patient was operated on through a left frontal approach, carefully avoiding the frontal sinus. The abscess was aspirated, and the patient was treated with intravenous antibiotics for several weeks. Postoperatively, the patient did well. There were no signs of enhancement on follow-up computed tomographic scans at 7 and 12 months postoperatively. CONCLUSION: Through a comprehensive immunological workup, an iga deficiency was identified postoperatively. Although the deficiency of a single type of Ig may be asymptomatic, complications from recurrent or chronic bacterial infections may occur. The deficiency of IgA, combined with a synergistic polymicrobial infection, contributed to the development of an intracranial abscess. A patient presenting with a brain abscess without any predisposing medical history should be evaluated for an underlying immune deficiency.
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Last update: September 2014